Tagged With "CUSTOMIZE"

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Re: UK bank starts personalising money

Ashley Bowen ·
I find the whole concept of personalisation intriguing. We have spent years de-personalising by replacing paper bills (which most people opened and then paid by cheque) with electronic bills (which many people don't open - direct debit payment is automatic), by replacing customer service reps with IVRs wherever possible and by replacing many face-to-face sales transactions with the web. Now we find the relationship with the customer is pretty low and we are introducing this concept of...
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Re: UK bank starts personalising money

Dominic Smith ·
Some of the banks also now let you personalise your debit / credit cards by adding a photo / image of your choice, and there are some ATMs in the east end of London that you can use in the Cockney language - so you can withdraw a 'Lady Godiva' or two. All of which goes to show there is innovation going on all the time, even for something as apparently straightforward as cash.
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Re: Why contracts are killing the telco business

Dominic Smith ·
Interesting news this week that Vodafone Spain, as an experiment, dropped its handset subsidies - the net result...they lost 639,000 customers in a quarter! So surprise surprise, they have reintroduced subsidised handsets. Long live contracts with handset subsidies! More details here: http://www.fiercewireless.com/...subsidies/2012-11-07
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Re: Why contracts are killing the telco business

Teresa Cottam ·
Hi Dominic - thanks for the link. If we put aside the fact that the Spanish market is tough because of the terrible recession there - meaning that customers are unusually price sensitive, then this story add some interesting dimensions to this issue. Once a market introduces handset subsidies it's hard to wean people off them, but that's also the key - "weaning". The CSP can't just stop subsidising full stop and that's the strategy: it has to design new offers and tariffs that appeal. I...
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Re: To infinity and beyond

Paul Hollingsworth ·
It has always bemused me, too: the fact that marketeers - experts in the lexicon necessary to grab our money - do not understand what words mean. No.1 in my most disliked are oil companies who call their basic brand Premium. Leaving them nowhere to go for the more expensive petrol/gas options. Regarding the delivery of Wireless routers by post: there are significant costs in putting them in vans, also possibly many variants of device to carry and vans have lots of stuff already so there is...
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Re: To infinity and beyond

David Chambers ·
I too have just had Infinity installed and empathise with your comments. By far the hardest part was deciding which commercial/pricing package to go for. However, I did think the fulfilment process went well for me - the hub turned up on schedule, and the engineer even called earlier in the day to offer immediate installation because of a cancellation. It only took an hour to set everything up and was handled very professionally throughout. I can't imagine anyone not remembering to be in for...
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Re: Why contracts are killing the telco business

Teresa Cottam ·
Dominic I agree - the attitude to prepaid customers is frankly antediluvian. It reminds me of that old addage: if you love something set it free, if it comes back it's yours, if not it was never meant to be. Trying to trap people shows a lack of confidence and sophistication, and as I said in the article it also shows you're fundamentally unreformed IMHO. Thanks for the comment
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Re: Why contracts are killing the telco business

Teresa Cottam ·
Laurence That's a very good point and something I will be returning to in my next post! Teresa
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Re: Why contracts are killing the telco business

Dominic Smith ·
Another great post Teresa, spot on. Contracts are an extremely blunt tool and are increasingly being shunned by customers who just cannot tolerate the lengthy lock-in period. This is highlighted by the number of people who are now happy to pay the full retail price for a high-end device such as the iPhone 5, and then to switch network service provider at free will. This is a massive failing by the MNOs who have all the assets to offer a great service and customer experience, but are more...
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Re: Why contracts are killing the telco business

Laurence Judah ·
I guess this comes down to the definition of "loyalty" that most operators use, i.e. a lack of churn. The only thing that can lead to genuine loyalty is behaving in a way which makes customers want to stay, rather than simply locking them in. This is what leads to the true customer engagement and strong NPS that all operators are after.
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Re: Why contracts are killing the telco business

Ashley Bowen ·
The trouble is, those expensive handsets still have to be paid for one way or another
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Re: Why contracts are killing the telco business

Teresa Cottam ·
I agree Ashley, although there seems to be a trend developing of people wanting to buy the handset upfront or reuse an existing handset... The effect the subsidised handset has had on market dynamics (and we must remember not all markets subsidise them!) is definitely subject matter worthy of a post in itself. :-)
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Re: UK bank starts personalising money

Teresa Cottam ·
Dear Customer Kudos I wish, wish, wish they'd let me personalise voicemail options - get so sick of having to listen to them read our a number (no idea who it is) before I'm *allowed* to listen to the message. Ideally I'd like them to match the number to the person in my contact list... is this really beyond the wit of man? The key to a lot of this is to let me choose and do the hard work (self-personalisation) rather than them keeping imposing things upon me because some clever marketing...
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Re: Warning! Billshock can seriously damage your brand

Teresa Cottam ·
Great story Customer Kudos I also think it's unfair putting this back onto the customer. How many times do we have to say that customers don't understand megabytes but they do understand services. You can't expect people to manage their spending if they don't understand what things cost. It's like going to a supermarket that only has prices in Japanese and then having to guess what it's likely to cost you for your evening meal. Great if you're Japanese; but for the average Brit it's going to...
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Re: Why are we still not reaping the benefits of a great customer experience

Ashley Bowen ·
Customer loyalty is often confused with customers finding it easier to stay put, rather than having any deep seated love of their CSP. As ever, many operators have their heads in the sand and run survey after survey to convince themselves that they are doing well. In reality, technicians who are often charged with developing the detail of new products frequently feel threatened by customer experience experts and pay little more than lip-service to their recommendations. This can be seen over...
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Re: Why are we still not reaping the benefits of a great customer experience

Teresa Cottam ·
I agree Ashley and as I said in a post around 18 months ago, relying on inertia is no longer enough: see http://www.telesperience.com/d...t/295574646108105672
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Re: Why are we still not reaping the benefits of a great customer experience

Paul Hollingsworth ·
All good stuff, but leads me to make the following 2 points and obvious conclusion: 1. Customer experience factors change depending on the available service features and network evolution. Without a stable classification(e.g. reliability, coverage, issue resolution, connection speed etc.) how can we compare results over time? "Experince" is too amorphous to be a useful measure - without precise clarity on what it is. 2. Changing Customer expectations cannot be assumed to be "one-way" (i.e.
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Re: Why are we still not reaping the benefits of a great customer experience

Teresa Cottam ·
Great comments Paul I agree the customer experience is not static and I also think it's not the same for each customer in terms of what they value. It might help readers to note that a while ago we divided the customer experience into four main areas and that we commented different customers place different emphasis on each. http://www.telesperience.com/d...t/295293073233580215 I personally think there is too much emphasis on things I don't value - like handsets - and not enough on things I...
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Re: Why are we still not reaping the benefits of a great customer experience

Monica Zeta ·
Hmmm... what customer experience? (1) Customer experience is determined/defined by two parties, but CSPs define it from an inside-out perspective alone. "Here you go dear customer, buy this, because we came up with it and we know what you want and need." (2) In order for the experience to be good, it has to begin even before the product or service is delivered - and even defined and design. That's why we keep talking about things in the wrong way. Is QoS important? When? How? Or whatever...
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Re: The business power of the unforgettable experience

Snowden Burgess ·
Great post, Customer Experience is truly about the human experience you get and you can only give this by understanding the needs of your customer. Too many CPS's are far too internally focused to every really consider what the end customers want and many sadly forget there is a customer at the end of everything they do!
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Re: Red hot telecoms tech: QoS gets up close and personal

Darran Clements ·
Adam O'Hare commented A great article. I specially like the Amazon delivery analogy. The market will structure itself around customer propensity to pay. And there are a number of service providers that already have customers doing exactly that. We (GoS Networks) have some unique solutions to deliver this to the edge, but feedback shows that knowledge of what is actually happening (monitoring and measurement) is equally important to the Service Provider as generating revenue streams.
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Re: Red hot telecoms tech: QoS gets up close and personal

Darran Clements ·
Teresa Cottam replied Thanks Adam – it’s hard to say everything you want to say about this without writing War and Peace. I guess my point is that I’d rather see us act when we see a problem occurring using existing competition law etc rather than constructing some huge piece of legislation against something that may (or may not) happen that will probably be biased, unwieldy and out of date before enacted. Such a law would almost certainly have unforeseen negative consequences (a bit like...
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Re: Rising coupon fraud presents opportunities for CSPs

LheaP ·
Couponing has become a way of life for many of us in these harsh economic times. However, many make use by counterfeiting them, and other kinds of coupon scam. If left unchecked, these irrepressible buyers might lead to price increases that hurt us all. A short term loan can help you pay for your food.
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Re: The Olympic opportunity: will UK CSPs be able to maximise it?

Dominic Smith ·
Interesting to see this post from before the Olympics and the recommendation for a more positive outlook. I fully agree and wrote along similar lines in my review of the Olympics about what we can all learn and apply in our own industry today. A more optimistic and positive approach, would be a huge step forward.
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Re: The Olympic opportunity: will UK CSPs be able to maximise it?

Teresa Cottam ·
Thanks Dominic - we'll also be writing a post mortem on this in more detail for the benefit of carriers in other regions who have significant events coming up.
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Re: The big 4G mistake: assuming customers share your enthusiasm

Teresa Cottam ·
*PLEASE NOTE THIS RESPONSE FROM EE* EE's press team asked us to point out the following: "that with EE you cannot go over your data allowance, so you’ll never experience “bill shock”. When you reach 80% of your allowance, you receive a warning message letting you know the limit is approaching. When you reach your data limit, you then are directed to a top-up page, and cannot use any more data without buying a top-up – this means customers are in complete control of how much data they use."...
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Re: Banks turn spotlight on mobile security

Monica Zeta ·
You are completely right, Teresa. "Were there is a problem there is an opportunity." That's how it's always been in business. The concern I have is that our industry has been systematically *good* at putting the burned on the customer, as opposed to understanding customer value. In other words, this should be seen as an opportunity for our industry to deliver value/assurance to customers that CSPs are there for them and have an edge compared to others that may come up with competing...
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Re: Driving business benefits through use of social media

Moayed Dib ·
Hi, how i can get the research report? regards,
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Re: Dear Dave - my journey through the nine circles of customer service hell

Teresa Cottam ·
The saga didn't end. To cut a long story short the repair didn't work and the phone was still faulty. As a now irate customer I ring the CSP again. There is still no resolution other than sending the phone for another repair. No offer of replacement or what to do while the phone is being repaired. I ring them the next day as by now I am paying for a service I cannot use and ask to cancel my contract. You'd think at this point they would be highly apologetic. Not so. I told them the contract...
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Re: Dear Dave - my journey through the nine circles of customer service hell

Jagadish Baddukonda ·
Hi Teresa, This is a classic case where there are different aspects that need to be worked on. Talking specifically about the Customer service area, the obvious point of focus would be to provide a unified view of the subscriber (and the related entities of the subscriber like the complaints, interactions, orders, campaigns) to all the channels. This needs a thorough understanding of the Customer care processes today and the different channels should only be a window while accessing and...
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Re: Dear Dave - my journey through the nine circles of customer service hell

Ashley Bowen ·
As Jagadish says, this is a textbook case that desperately needs a unified view of each customer from all angles. From this you can then understand the value of each customer in terms of revenue, their up-selling potential and their propensity to churn - you can build some pretty good customer profiles. These are invaluable for customer management within the organisation. However, customer profiles are also a valuable new revenue stream for other organisations wanting to target their own...
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Re: Dear Dave - my journey through the nine circles of customer service hell

Ashley Bowen ·
Cost of customer service is something that is easy to measure and is therefore concentrated on by bean counters. What is less often measured is cost of bad customer service. I wonder what sort of fault and complaint analysis frameworks Three have in place. Do they know what were the 10 most prolific causes of faults and complaints during August and were there plans set in place for addressing these. Are they sure that the ten most prolific causes of faults and complaints during July (and...
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Re: Dear Dave - my journey through the nine circles of customer service hell

Teresa Cottam ·
Thanks Ashley - good points. But I would add that while "bean counters" need to be focused on costs, and operations on performance, we need someone to focus on the customer. The ideal is to achieve balance and a virtuous circle. As you imply, by learning lessons readily available to be learnt we can improve performance, lower costs *and* deliver a better customer experience. To deliver this requires senior management in telco to go beyond paying lip service to customer experience and to...
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Re: Dear Dave - my journey through the nine circles of customer service hell

Jagadish Baddukonda ·
This is not just about Customer Service, which is only an outer layer. It is about the core operational processes like unified view of a customer across the channels, handling a fault reported by a customer, relationship with vendors (like Nokia in this instance), return material authorization and strategic decision on whether the CSP should just be a reseller of handsets or do they also own the handset fault after the sale has been made.
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Re: Dear Dave - my journey through the nine circles of customer service hell

Teresa Cottam ·
Hi Jagadish Thanks for your insightful comment. You are quite right that we have far more to fix than just customer service. In this post though I wanted to highlight the customer service journey I went through. There were a lot of organisational, policy, process and system reasons it wasn't good. What I wanted to highlilght was the experience from the customer perspective - the top layer. What I'd like to dig into now is what we can do to improve this journey through improving the...
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Re: Dear Dave - my journey through the nine circles of customer service hell

Paul Hollingsworth ·
Isn't it so obvious that bean-counters are at work here. E.g. Recent personal example of a Customer Experience team conversation in relation to IVR design I was involved in, that the company's IVR was designed to keep customers from getting to speak to an agent. Need I say more (and I could!)
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Re: Dear Dave - my journey through the nine circles of customer service hell

Dominic Smith ·
My recent IVR experiences certainly fit with Paul's comments. It seems to be taking longer than ever to navigate IVR menus before finally getting an option to talk to someone. On the basis that these days people generally try the self-service channels first, when they call customer services it is usually because they want to speak to someone!
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Re: Dear Dave - my journey through the nine circles of customer service hell

Teresa Cottam ·
Thanks Paul and Dominic I agree we have too much focus on cost. While cost is important it isn't the only important thing. By focusing too much on minimising cost we actually negate opportunity. By talking to the customer we find out things about who they are, what they want/need, and build loyalty. There is nothing more loyalty-generating than a problem fixed well. We also have an opportunity to upsell/cross-sell. How can we claim to be customer centric when we see the customer as a cost...
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Re: Dear Dave - my journey through the nine circles of customer service hell

Teresa Cottam ·
Thanks for all the great feedback on Twitter, Skype and LinkedIn. We seem to be resonating with this one! However, as much as I want 3UK to listen to my story, I also don't want to make them the whipping boys of the industry. They are no worse and no better than many other CSPs. So as a caveat I'd like to point out that the purpose of my story is to illustrate that even with good intentions, and even if parts of the journey are excellent, the customer journey as a whole can still be a...
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Re: Dear Dave - my journey through the nine circles of customer service hell

Dominic Smith ·
Hi Teresa I have great sympathy with you on this one, having recently been taken round the houses by my service provider over something as trivial as a Voicemail problem (hardly cutting edge technology). I must have had more than a dozen phone calls and 90 minutes on the phone to their call centre, each time having to repeat the same story (which was getting increasingly longer with each call) despite them apparently having a CRM system and "recording the call for training and monitoring...
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Re: Dear Dave - my journey through the nine circles of customer service hell

Teresa Cottam ·
Hi Dominic I'm sorry to hear your equally appalling tale of CSP malperformance. It sounds like an eg from a PPT slide that a vendor might use to illustrate why the CSP needs to implement better systems and processes! But I must say that after all these years, plus investment in systems and processes (and hand wringing) the customer journey doesn't seem any easier. What struck me as missing from your experience was the human element. You were forced through a process that was at best...
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Re: Dear Dave - my journey through the nine circles of customer service hell

Dominic Smith ·
You're right Teresa. If the CRM system is not making it easy enough for different CSRs to pick up and put down the problem, then just someone taking ownership of it would make a massive difference. As an unhappy customer, you need to know who the go to person is so you don't have to re-explain the problem each time you call. Then if they are not dealing with it you can still escalate if you need to. And of course it's not always about poor customer service - if they do fix it, you can thank...
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Re: Customer Experience: The Negative Effect of Fire Fighting Cultures

Teresa Cottam ·
My big question though Snowden is how does a company that has fallen into this trap get out? Any suggestions?
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Re: Customer Experience: The Negative Effect of Fire Fighting Cultures

Snowden Burgess ·
Customer Experience is a not the easiest of concepts to define and quantify within the Telecommunications industry, there is no defined standards or approach. The one consistent approach across most Telco’s and Service Integrators is that they accept how important Customer Experience is to their success but they then allocate limited funds and resource to actual support any consistent or structured approach to improving it. After 20 years in the industry I have seen multiple attempts at...
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Re: The Customer is king – Down with the king!

Teresa Cottam ·
Peter - I think what this raises for me is the issue of why be customer centric? For me customer centricity is not about fluffy stuff but about the fact it is a better way to do business. It also raises the issue of short v long-term business impacts. Too often today we measure only short-term impacts. These are important, but too much focus on them means that we don't understand the longer-term health of a business. When a business hits problems everyone is then shocked - when a careful...
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Re: Why billshock is actually a risk to CSPs and not just to customers

Teresa Cottam ·
A few more details that readers might find interesting. In August 2014, the Sunday Times reported a survey of 1,300 parents which found that 21% of respondents had faced billshock after a child bought game extras. 96% of parents thought companies should make it more difficult for children to spend their money. 80% of complaints the regulator PhonePayPlus receives relating to non-adult downloadable content (such as apps and games) is linked to minors. Complaints involving minors typically...
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Re: Why billshock is actually a risk to CSPs and not just to customers

Teresa Cottam ·
On Twitter a £1 million billshock was revealed. CSP = EE. See: http://ow.ly/i/6G41l With thanks to David Rogers @drogersuk and Zahid Ghadialy @zahidtg for the link.
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Re: Cloudshock - why the true cost of cloud is rarely understood

Paul Hollingsworth ·
Thanks Tracy, some interesting information - though personally, I'm not convinced that the available stats on DDOS proves the cost-benefit case either way. Has anyone created a useful classification of Cloud Services, or even a definition (that holds water without being a short-story length)? Its getting so hard to talk about Cloud in any meaningful way (although, it always was). Cloud service is so ubiquitous, most IT users don't know whether they're using a cloud service or not (at home or...
Blog Post

Why the contact centre is dead

Teresa Cottam ·
Telesperience Chief Strategist Teresa Cottam looks at why the contact centre is a doomed concept, and what lies beyond.
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Re: Why the contact centre is dead

Liron Golan (Nice) ·
I fully agree. Customer service organizations have always been in a continuous struggle to respond to the ever-changing landscape of customer expectations. No other industry has had to adapt and evolve more quickly to the new era of the empowered consumer, the growing number of communication channels and the challenges of the new millennial employee. And the contact center, with its special position, seated at the crossroads of customers, channel and employees, has been leading the customer...
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