Tagged With "business"

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Re: Is telecoms an old boys' club?

lobomerchant ·
A great CEO can do a lot many things because a CEO has the power and responsibility to always think of best for his company! Office phone systems
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Re: Warning! Billshock can seriously damage your brand

Teresa Cottam ·
Great story Customer Kudos I also think it's unfair putting this back onto the customer. How many times do we have to say that customers don't understand megabytes but they do understand services. You can't expect people to manage their spending if they don't understand what things cost. It's like going to a supermarket that only has prices in Japanese and then having to guess what it's likely to cost you for your evening meal. Great if you're Japanese; but for the average Brit it's going to...
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Re: Why are we still not reaping the benefits of a great customer experience

Ashley Bowen ·
Customer loyalty is often confused with customers finding it easier to stay put, rather than having any deep seated love of their CSP. As ever, many operators have their heads in the sand and run survey after survey to convince themselves that they are doing well. In reality, technicians who are often charged with developing the detail of new products frequently feel threatened by customer experience experts and pay little more than lip-service to their recommendations. This can be seen over...
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Re: Why are we still not reaping the benefits of a great customer experience

Teresa Cottam ·
I agree Ashley and as I said in a post around 18 months ago, relying on inertia is no longer enough: see http://www.telesperience.com/d...t/295574646108105672
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Re: Why are we still not reaping the benefits of a great customer experience

Paul Hollingsworth ·
All good stuff, but leads me to make the following 2 points and obvious conclusion: 1. Customer experience factors change depending on the available service features and network evolution. Without a stable classification(e.g. reliability, coverage, issue resolution, connection speed etc.) how can we compare results over time? "Experince" is too amorphous to be a useful measure - without precise clarity on what it is. 2. Changing Customer expectations cannot be assumed to be "one-way" (i.e.
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Re: Why are we still not reaping the benefits of a great customer experience

Teresa Cottam ·
Great comments Paul I agree the customer experience is not static and I also think it's not the same for each customer in terms of what they value. It might help readers to note that a while ago we divided the customer experience into four main areas and that we commented different customers place different emphasis on each. http://www.telesperience.com/d...t/295293073233580215 I personally think there is too much emphasis on things I don't value - like handsets - and not enough on things I...
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Re: Why are we still not reaping the benefits of a great customer experience

Monica Zeta ·
Hmmm... what customer experience? (1) Customer experience is determined/defined by two parties, but CSPs define it from an inside-out perspective alone. "Here you go dear customer, buy this, because we came up with it and we know what you want and need." (2) In order for the experience to be good, it has to begin even before the product or service is delivered - and even defined and design. That's why we keep talking about things in the wrong way. Is QoS important? When? How? Or whatever...
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Re: The business power of the unforgettable experience

Snowden Burgess ·
Great post, Customer Experience is truly about the human experience you get and you can only give this by understanding the needs of your customer. Too many CPS's are far too internally focused to every really consider what the end customers want and many sadly forget there is a customer at the end of everything they do!
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Re: The ugly truth about OTTs

Teresa Cottam ·
At TS we like to say that OTTs are simply business customers you haven't yet monetised. But, as you know monica, I really dislike the term "OTT" because it begs the question "over the top of what?" and there you go, back to the network again. Surely we're all grown up now and can find ways of playing the game to create win-win scenarios?
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Re: Using LinkedIn for business? Time to review how you’re using it?

Darran Clements ·
RubyWhite posted I’ve found LinkedIn useful for keeping track of all the companies that colleagues have previously worked at. With that knowledge it’s easier to get introductions to the right employees at large corporations. I also like the description from @DrSamuelJohnson: LinkedIn (n.) ghostly Coffee-House of Commerce where the recently unemploy’d remind the World of their Existence
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Re: Using LinkedIn for business? Time to review how you’re using it?

Darran Clements ·
Teresa Cottam replied Thanks J for your comment My tip for those who want to use it for getting jobs is to think strategically about your career and invest in eg a blog which is linked to your LinkedIn profile, develop a solid network of contacts, and be a good citizen on LinkedIn and elsewhere. People have to be more aware of how their social media profile affects their career prospects long term. Change jobs every 12 months for 10 years and that says something about your commitment and...
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Re: There are better ways to do PR my techno friends…

Darran Clements ·
Teresa Cottam commented Great “blogback” from James over at OSS Line on this topic. Since writing this piece I’ve taken a lot of confessions on this; but rather than just confessing your guilt can you please all make it your New Year’s Resolution to write easier-to-read PR! (Pretty please!) http://www.ossline.com/2010/10...-press-releases.html
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Re: Is "who" now the most important question we need to answer?

Ashley Bowen ·
It strikes me that there are too many disparate initiatives going on at the moment to establish identity (including age), mostly to very low levels of assurance. In UK, the Government is planning to dramatically increase the numbers of e-transactions, starting with their Universal Benefits system. To do this, their are aiming to establish a market whereby third party suppliers will "validate" an identity to see if it exists and then "verify" it to see that the person claiming that identity...
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Re: Billing: not dead, but boring?

Paul Hollingsworth ·
Oh Olivier, what fun we all had. There appears to be no imagination left in the billing vendor or buyer communities anymore. Maybe its just that the key business drivers have been solved. I do remember back in 1991, how long it took to change a voice-only rating system to handle a new weekend tariff. What mind-changing substances where the telco marketing team on? A different rate at the weekend?? Goodness, me! Friends and Family?? Eat you heart out. There are of course big issues with...
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Re: Billing: not dead, but boring?

Peter Bowen ·
In the good old days billing was not simply billing. It was customer care and billing, and at its core was rating. However, these days the talk is of CRM, real-time rating/ policy management and product catalogues and if we strip these elements from CCBS you’re left with an accounting system; which is where Oracle and SAP were a few years back. Even today there are examples of solutions with off-the-shelf accounting packages integrated with CRM and rating components. It could be argued that...
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Re: Rising coupon fraud presents opportunities for CSPs

LheaP ·
Couponing has become a way of life for many of us in these harsh economic times. However, many make use by counterfeiting them, and other kinds of coupon scam. If left unchecked, these irrepressible buyers might lead to price increases that hurt us all. A short term loan can help you pay for your food.
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Re: ATM cyberheist signposts increasing fraud risks for CSPs

DominicQ ·
MoneyRate.com releases a survey about every six months about checking charges and other bank charges and so forth. Give credit where it's due, banks are regular, in that the charges are going up again. Get a cash advance to help pay your overdraft fees.
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Re: Transformation 2.0: Digital Transformation

Paul Hollingsworth ·
This is a fascinating topic and the one big question for me is whether its wholly academic in nature or is there something that the aspiring entrepreneur (or CIO) is able to control or predict about the changing nature and scale of transformation. Teresa, as you know, I spent a lot of time in the late oo's thinking about CSP transformation and how it could be delivered more easily and successfully. However, the timing for a major-transformation enablement product was wrong, and I think that...
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Re: Transformation 2.0: Digital Transformation

Teresa Cottam ·
Paul Hollingsworth posted: Which all set me to wondering why transformation is so very different a beast, than it was 10 years ago. Some great thoughts Paul. I see new problems in the change of approach but I do like the fact that we're now focused on commercial rather than IT outcomes. One thought that occurs to me is if we're focusing on business value then will traditional processes and systems deliver that? If we were inventing the service provider business from scratch with a clean...
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Re: The Olympic opportunity: will UK CSPs be able to maximise it?

Dominic Smith ·
Interesting to see this post from before the Olympics and the recommendation for a more positive outlook. I fully agree and wrote along similar lines in my review of the Olympics about what we can all learn and apply in our own industry today. A more optimistic and positive approach, would be a huge step forward.
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Re: The Olympic opportunity: will UK CSPs be able to maximise it?

Teresa Cottam ·
Thanks Dominic - we'll also be writing a post mortem on this in more detail for the benefit of carriers in other regions who have significant events coming up.
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Re: The big 4G mistake: assuming customers share your enthusiasm

Teresa Cottam ·
*PLEASE NOTE THIS RESPONSE FROM EE* EE's press team asked us to point out the following: "that with EE you cannot go over your data allowance, so you’ll never experience “bill shock”. When you reach 80% of your allowance, you receive a warning message letting you know the limit is approaching. When you reach your data limit, you then are directed to a top-up page, and cannot use any more data without buying a top-up – this means customers are in complete control of how much data they use."...
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Re: Why operational efficiency does not guarantee success

Seth Greenberg ·
Teresa, Our concerns about the ability of mobile operators to thrive in the future echo your post - Efficiency good; Customer Experience and new revenue streams critical. It can be achieved once operators start to believe in themselves and evolve past the wholesale bit merchant phase. I hope you will be joining Mobixell at Broadband Traffic Management in London in two weeks. Noam Green, our VP Products & Marketing will be talking about this topic precisely on day 1 of the conference.
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Re: Why operational efficiency does not guarantee success

Teresa Cottam ·
Hi Seth Maybe Noam could share some of his thoughts on this topic with the community for the benefit of those who cannot attend BBTM? (I'll be there though!) It's a great topic for a chat event :-) Teresa
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Re: BT superfast broadband controversy highlights change required in telecom business models

kimmedward ·
A phone network has exchanges handling voice calls and interconnections between the exchanges for those calls. Broadband and data networks are different although merging. RTA Cabinets
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Re: Capacity crunch: it’s not what you think

Darran Clements ·
Robin Burton commented: I think that we are headed for a two or three track approach. “Bronze” users will get an “all you can eat” plan, but it will be subject to throttling if the bandwidth is needed by “Silver” or “Gold” users who are paying for consumption based on quantity. This will rapidly lead to serious users paying more for their usage (and probably being happy to do so if they get the quality). This should then fund the development of more capacity. If this does not happen, then...
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Re: Driving business benefits through use of social media

Moayed Dib ·
Hi, how i can get the research report? regards,
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Re: Businesses are cutomers too, so how do we sell to them?

Ashley Bowen ·
I don't believe many businesses want to buy communications services per se, or IT services for that matter - they are a means to an end. However, most businesses realise they need various layers of technology to make them more successful. The CSP that really understands that a hair salon (for instance) needs to manage appointments, needs to keep accounts, needs to send customer reminders, needs to manage supplies and perhaps even do a few analytics, sometimes needing to do this remotely from...
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Re: Escape the circle of silos by using an enterprise product catalog

Liron Golan (Nice) ·
Hi Teresa, I was referring to the fact that the way to become free from the circle of more silos containing increasing amounts of data that needs to be synchronized with other silos is to combine all product data to a single centralized container.
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Re: Escape the circle of silos by using an enterprise product catalog

Teresa Cottam ·
Liron - can you explain a little more about what this "circle of silos" is in your mind? I agree silos are a major problem, but why are they a circle?
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Re: Business innovation – the new telecoms challenge

Teresa Cottam ·
Andy - we're great proponents of simple pricing. It removes barriers to sales and is greatly desired by customers. Pragmatically it also decreases billshock, churn, customer enquiry and complaint. See: http://www.telesperience.com/b...-approach-to-pricing
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Re: Commercial lessons that still haven't been learnt

Paul Hollingsworth ·
Oh Teresa, that's the $64,000 question - with the much bigger value answer. It reminds me of the "Walled-garden" vs. "open" internet discussion we all so enjoyed 15-20 years ago. In the end, few telcos gained significant content revenues (that market crashed, anyway), but did pretty well out of the broadband "pipe" revenue. I suppose, in the UK the purchase of sport content by BT is a potential game-changer and one of the most interesting moves. There are also many interesting business...
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Re: Commercial lessons that still haven't been learnt

Snowden Burgess ·
Teresa I think your words of warning are very valid, the industry is ignoring the blinding obvious and that is that their future employee and customer base is about to significantly change, the old guard of "Baby Boomers" who built the current corporate CSPs will be leaving employment in the next 2/3 years with a new wave of "Generation Y & Z" entering to replace them. These new employees and customers are digital natives, who embrace change and expect innovation! Most large organization...
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Re: Commercial lessons that still haven't been learnt

Teresa Cottam ·
Thank you Paul and Snowden There is certainly a lot of money to be made - but in a different place now to where it was before. If operators just sell SIMs and connectivity there's going to be little revenue growth for many of them - so how do they justify investments? Snowden is right we do need faster innovation cycles. And, as Paul says, there is an option of buying smaller companies for innovation when you're cash rich. However, some thoughts on that latter point. Successful acquisition...
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Re: Shadow Cloud and how it changes the role of IT

Ashley Bowen ·
"Brother Bowen" writes: As we know, the IT Department is a service department: a supplier of IT services to "the business" as cost effectively as possible. As we also know, this requires a whole host of highly specialist skill sets, not least of which is identifying and embracing relevant technologies at an ever increasing rate. I don't believe the Cloud changes this basic remit of "service" in any way at all - it is just a new (flexible and exciting) set of delivery mechanisms. The Cloud's...
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Re: Shadow Cloud and how it changes the role of IT

Peter Bowen ·
Teresa, spot on analysis however, whilst there is a real need for change in IT change is also needed on the business side. A 10 year study of projects in the UK carried out by the University of Oxford shows that over 80% run over time or budget or fail to meet expectations; the biggest contributors where poorly defined requirements and lack of business focus. So business users going off doing their own thing is highly unlikely to change the situation, just simple shift the focus of...
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Re: The Customer is king – Down with the king!

Teresa Cottam ·
Peter - I think what this raises for me is the issue of why be customer centric? For me customer centricity is not about fluffy stuff but about the fact it is a better way to do business. It also raises the issue of short v long-term business impacts. Too often today we measure only short-term impacts. These are important, but too much focus on them means that we don't understand the longer-term health of a business. When a business hits problems everyone is then shocked - when a careful...
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Re: Solving the flexibility versus efficiency conundrum in the enterprise market

Teresa Cottam ·
Hi Paul Ah I see the issue. You're thinking infrastructure and I'm thinking business. And I realise there is a little confusion between indirect (reseller) v direct sales and indirect v direct business model (see below). Both of which are relevant to the strategy in the digital supply chain. An indirect business model would be one where the money comes from selling something to someone other than the end user of a service. An example would be that you are a customer of the CSP but the CSP...
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Re: Solving the flexibility versus efficiency conundrum in the enterprise market

Paul Hollingsworth ·
Teresa, I'm missing why direct versus indirect is a major concideration? I get that a Diect CSP will be able to focus their energies on delivery of the last-mile (copper, fibre or air), if they prioritise this, which is not necessarily possible for the Indirect CSP. However, when one takes a look at even just an SME's network needs (e.g. in-the-home-office, on-the-move (walk/rail/car), at customer's premises etc.), then the strengths of the "directly-connected" CSP are less of a...
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Re: Solving the flexibility versus efficiency conundrum in the enterprise market

Snowden Burgess ·
Teresa, great post and well said. For me the future of the CSP is uncertain as many will struggle to achieve what you have laid out above. I have seen several CSPs in the last few years attack the SME market with plans to provide innovation and be easy to work with, only to provide poor customer service and individual Me-To products that cannot be connected as a solution for the SME. The CPSs that will survive the next 2-3 years will be those that can partner effectively, with a...
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Re: Solving the flexibility versus efficiency conundrum in the enterprise market

Teresa Cottam ·
Thanks Snowden I think we have to cut through the PowerPoint to acknowledge that there is a huge gap between what executives are telling the market versus what is actually being achieved. We do see progress in incremental areas of innovation, but not so many fundamental "fresh air" shifts. What worries me particularly is the short-termism which means if something doesn't work within 6 months you bin it. I can't help but think that the "failing fast" mantra is being translated into not really...
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Re: Solving the flexibility versus efficiency conundrum in the enterprise market

Paul Hollingsworth ·
Agree with the above. Of course there are lots of CSP models currently delivering service, so one should not overly generalise (which I'm too often guilty of). The large CSPs do not seem to be set up to be sufficiently inventive or disruptive to lead this change. So it's really down to smaller specialist CSPs (ie. market focused) to look at the broader need of their customers, and deliver the combination of IT and networks that can be packaged sufficiently to provide the cost vs. benefit...
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Re: Solving the flexibility versus efficiency conundrum in the enterprise market

Teresa Cottam ·
Thanks Paul. There's a lot of money to be made out of SME, but it ain't a one size fits all market and as you describe smaller companies may find it easier to understand and engage with the vertical niches. That, however, limits the role of the CSP to an indirect model (which is largely where we are today). If it's going to be indirect then the model, priorities and requirements are different to the direct model. Of course, hybrid is extremely viable with you choosing 3 or 4 verticals to go...
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Re: Why billshock is actually a risk to CSPs and not just to customers

Teresa Cottam ·
A few more details that readers might find interesting. In August 2014, the Sunday Times reported a survey of 1,300 parents which found that 21% of respondents had faced billshock after a child bought game extras. 96% of parents thought companies should make it more difficult for children to spend their money. 80% of complaints the regulator PhonePayPlus receives relating to non-adult downloadable content (such as apps and games) is linked to minors. Complaints involving minors typically...
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Re: Why billshock is actually a risk to CSPs and not just to customers

Teresa Cottam ·
On Twitter a £1 million billshock was revealed. CSP = EE. See: http://ow.ly/i/6G41l With thanks to David Rogers @drogersuk and Zahid Ghadialy @zahidtg for the link.
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Re: Shadow Cloud and how it changes the role of IT

Teresa Cottam ·
Thanks Peter I think it's an important point that the "business" does not always know what IT does or what it spends the money on. I know of many cases where budgets are cut UNTIL it's pointed out what that money is being spent on in a business-centric manner. When you explain the business impact of cutting something it enables the business to decide if it values that service or not. (Sometimes cuts are then reversed!) One of the interesting things coming out of Cloud is this transparency of...
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Re: Cloudshock - why the true cost of cloud is rarely understood

Paul Hollingsworth ·
Thanks Tracy, some interesting information - though personally, I'm not convinced that the available stats on DDOS proves the cost-benefit case either way. Has anyone created a useful classification of Cloud Services, or even a definition (that holds water without being a short-story length)? Its getting so hard to talk about Cloud in any meaningful way (although, it always was). Cloud service is so ubiquitous, most IT users don't know whether they're using a cloud service or not (at home or...
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Re: Pay Now may be a revelation but it's not a revolution

Paul Hollingsworth ·
Goodness me; I've just had a "Deja vu, all over again" moment - as the recently departed Yogi Berra is oft quoted. I couldn't agree more and wonder whether this conversation is coming around because CSPs really haven't sorted their capability yet, or whether software vendors are making a bit of mischief. There are many electronic ways of taking payment at an ePOS till (i.e. in person as delivered in the pre-pay market) and CSPs have ways that pay-now can be delivered in "the moment of the...
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Re: Show me the money from IoT

Paul Hollingsworth ·
A very interesting topic and one that needs a lot more thought. I suspect that the lack of action from CSPs is that a) they have no idea what will work and what won't (and failing on lots on "won't works" is too painful for any action) and b) The business case does not yet hold up - for the same reasons as a). Regarding being too late to recover lost revenue to OTT players: In the UK the exceptionally late realisation that OTT TV (and especially OTT Sport TV) has a value is frankly shocking,...
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Re: Other lessons CSPs can learn from retailers

Paul Hollingsworth ·
Great article - Isn't it amazing how insular markets often are- until a major event (or unexpected change) occurs? Old style Petrol-retail (oil) companies and grocery stores were once as disconnected as water and electricity. Gas and Electric suppliers were on different planets and the idea of a computer manufacturer getting into consumer music players, totally unthinkable. Let alone going on to completely change the mobile communications industry. Surely the stuff of Science-fiction! Having...
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